Help NOAA refine its Cloud-Sensing Techniques with the SatCam App

Last week I tweeted out an article from Popular Science. http://www.popsci.com/hows-weather-over-there The article talked about two new iOS apps, SatCam and WxSat. WxSat displays real-time satellite imagery, animated and hi-resolution. More than just visible imagery, WxSat provides infrared and water vapor imagery. Infrared imagery is essential for meteorologists because it can be used at night …

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No two alike? Snowflake Shapes and Formation

Good evening everyone, No two snowflakes have the same shape, right? It's almost Christmas so its time for a festive post, and I personally can't think of a more festive topic than snowflakes. Those beautiful, 6-sided symmetrical designs that your mind immediately goes to. But is that really the case? Do they all really look …

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DYK: “Chemtrails” are a lie!

Good evening everyone, There's a lot of jet contrails in the sky today, and that's not surprising considering my proximity to Albuquerque's Sunport (an international airport) and Kirtland Air Force Base. The contrails are the long, crisscrossing lines formed by passing planes. Unfortunately, many people don't understand what contrails are and make wild "chemtrail" accusations. …

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Dr. Jeff Masters steals my thunder, but “wunderfully” explains Saharan Dust and Atlantic Hurricane Activity

Good evening everyone, I admit I'm a little down this evening. You see all day at work I had this great idea for tonight's post, but it seems the king of all weather bloggers has stolen my thunder! THE Dr. Jeff Masters of Weather Underground's fabulous Wunderblog wrote a wonderfully masterful entry today on African …

Continue reading Dr. Jeff Masters steals my thunder, but “wunderfully” explains Saharan Dust and Atlantic Hurricane Activity

8 illuminating facts about clouds

From the great TED blog, a must-follow!

TED Blog

The Cloud Appreciation Society may be the first official organization to celebrate the beauty of clouds, but these fluffy pillows in the sky have been a source of fascination since 3,000 B.C., when they were first discussed in the Upanishads. Aristotle poetically described cloud formation in his 350 B.C. work Meteorology as the process by which “the finest and sweetest water is every day carried up and is dissolved into vapor and rises to the upper region, where it is condensed again by the cold and so returns to the earth.” Clouds have been the subject of Georgia O’Keefe paintings and are the namesake of Joni Mitchell’s second album.

But the gorgeous cotton balls drifting 60,000 feet above our heads are more than atmospheric decoration that inspire great works of art and philosophy. Clouds come in all shapes and sizes and are the sites of a number of fascinating meteorological phenomena…

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